Gone – Book Review

Gone

 

Released: June 24th, 2008
Publisher:
Katherine Tegen Books 
# of Pages:
560, Hardcover
Source:
Borrowed from Library
Summary:
In the blink of an eye, everyone disappears. Gone. Except for the young. There are teens, but not one single adult. Just as suddenly, there are no phones, no internet, no television. No way to get help. And no way to figure out what’s happened. Hunger threatens. Bullies rule. A sinister creature lurks. Animals are mutating.

And the teens themselves are changing, developing new talents—unimaginable, dangerous, deadly powers—that grow stronger by the day. It’s a terrifying new world. Sides are being chosen, a fight is shaping up. Townies against rich kids. Bullies against the weak. Powerful against powerless. And time is running out: On your birthday, you disappear just like everyone else…

– Via Goodreads
Rating: 4/5 stars

First of all, I never imagined that I would like this story as much as I actually did. I never actually planned on picking it up from my school’s library, but after taking a quiz in the library for my Latin class my teacher told us we couldn’t get books out of our bags to read, instead we had to check one out from the library. (She made this new rule that we couldn’t touch any of our stuff during testing times because some students were caught cheating, ugh.

So now I can’t read my own book afterwards and I have to start a new one. :/) I was looking for something that I thought was quick and easy so I picked up this book, and I enjoyed it a lot more than I thought I would. Now, on to my review..

The writing style of this book was not too bad. It could have been better, maybe a little more sentence variety, but it didn’t bother me too much. The plotline was overall pretty good. I think the pacing of all the events was decent because I was never bored of reading this book, however, some people believe there was too much happening in such little time. It just depends on the individual reading the book.

What I didn’t like about the plot was I felt like there were too many twists involved in the story. The main premise of the story (everyone over the age of 15 suddenly disappearing), would have been enough for a story, but I don’t think some of the additions were necessary. (Talking/mutated animals, really?) I loved the main concept of the story, but I feel like there was too much added in.

The characters, in my opinion, weren’t portrayed the way they should have been. The kids seemed to be acting much older than they were; the oldest are only 14 year olds, yet they acted like young adults. I understand if they acted a little older because they had to step up and become more responsible so they could survive on their own, but they did not act like the kids they really are. (This may have not been an issue to others, but it affected my opinion of the story. I kept forgetting they were just kids because of how they were acting.)

That was not the only thing that bothered me about these characters. While reading I noticed that they were either really good kids or really bad kids. The kids were either the “good guy” or the villain; there was no in-between. They should have been more diverse. I couldn’t connect with the characters at all. There was always just a few traits given to the characters. There weren’t any in-depth descriptions of them, so it was really hard to relate to them and they didn’t feel very realistic.

Even though there were several things in the story I did not like, I still really enjoyed reading this book. Overall it was very action-packed and thought-provoking! While reading it kept me thinking a lot about what would happen if this happened in real life. I love when a book really makes me think. This book is very enjoyable, and I definitely recommend it.

You can find Gone here.

 

 

Guest review contributed by Lovely Little Reviews xo. This blogger writes the best reviews possible to help authors get their work in front of readers.


The Fourth CrusadeThe Fourth Crusade

The year is 1202 and the Catholic Church rules the hearts and minds of all Europeans. The leader of the Church, Pope Innocent III, issues a summons to every able bodied man and boy: Take up arms and reclaim Jerusalem from the Muslims. The un-civilized world has been called to wage holy war.

In the streets of Barcelona, Spain, Rayjo de Merafiza is celebrated as a hero of the Third Crusade. His name is known throughout the land. But the peaceful life has never been Rayjo’s purpose, and now he must join the Fourth Crusade. His two adolescent sons are also deemed fit for service and they follow their father to war.

Ruggiero is Rayjo’s first son and his quiet, passive nature puts him on the path to Catholic priesthood. In seminary, Ruggiero is confronted with the horrors of religious fanaticism disguised as holy providence. When he joins his father, his pious teachings are put to the ultimate test. Juan is Rayjo’s younger son and is endowed with his father’s violent, unrestrained temper.

As the armies of Christianity gather for the greatest war of their lives, a few powerful men and unfortunate circumstances turn the Europeans away from their intended target and onto Constantinople, the most unlikely of targets. The Orthodox Greeks are forced to furiously defend their homeland.

Set against the backdrop of Europe’s tumultuous Dark Ages, Butler weaves the tragic tale of the Fourth Crusade. From the streets of Barcelona to the mighty battles in the East, readers will come to understand how the greatest army in the world assaulted the wrong nation. How Christians slaughtered Christians in the pursuit of money, power and perhaps most important of all…Legacy.


 

 

 

 

 

 


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7 thoughts on “Gone – Book Review”

  1. The basic concept reminds me of another novel I read years ago. The book–whose name I can’t remember–involved everyone who was an adult dying from a strange disease, leaving only the children behind. This was no accident as the disease was introduced by an alien race who then came to the planet to enslave the kids because they reasoned that–without adults–the children wouldn’t be able to fight back.

    Like

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