Tag Archives: contemporary

The Palm Reader – Book Review

 

The Palm Reader by Christopher Bowron

 

Synopsis:

Jackson Walker once again faces his demons in this haunting sequel to Devil in the Grass. Now working as an investigative lawyer for Peter Robertson, Jack teams with Janie Callaghan to solve the disappearance of a sleazy client specializing in taboo pornography. Meanwhile the evil head of the Church of Satan weaves an intricate web to lure Walker as the sacrificial lamb in an Everglades Black Mass ritual.

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Call Me By Your Name – Book Review

 

I’ve always believed that a book’s power lies in its ability to make it’s readers feel. As someone who’s been both an avid book reader and an extremely emotional person all my life, feeling for the stories I’ve read has never been a problem for me. Its probably why I spent my first 10 years as a reader reading romance novels because they always guaranteed a happy ending; they were probably so far off the mark as far as realism is concerned, but they were relatively painless and angst-free.

This book is not painless and angst-free.

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After the Fire – Book Review

 

After the Fire by Will Hill

Usborne Publishing Ltd., 2017

Genre: Young Adult Contemporary Fiction

 

“The things I’ve seen are burned into me, like scars that refuse to fade”.

I picked up After the Fire without reading the blurb or having prior knowledge of its subject. Coming to the book raw and without preconceptions I was quickly immersed in an intense atmosphere of fear, suspicion and confusion. The disjointed memories of survivor Moonbeam are filled with gunshots and burning fire. It is not clear how her family of Brothers and Sisters – the Lord’s Legion community – reached this devastating and tragic crisis.

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Editorial Review – American River: Tributaries

 

Title: American River: Tributaries

Author: Mallory M. O’Connor

Genre: Historical Fiction

 

American River: Tributaries follows the lives of three families of Irish, Mexican, and Japanese descent. Though their ancestors all settled on the American River in Northern California, the generations following spread out across the country, making the families’ interconnection all the more unlikely. But as the characters’ lives overlap and collide, they undergo tremendous growth and are opened to new levels of understanding of each other, of life, and of themselves.

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Editorial Review – Revoked

 

Title: Revoked

Author: MK Pachan

Genre: Fiction/Mystery & Detective/Police Procedural

 

Revoked focuses on a double-homicide of the worst imaginable. A mother and child are found dead in their home by Detectives Cam Clay and Mitch Raines. Detective Clay is hell-bent on solving these murders as the suspect list grows and the body count continues to rise around him and his team.

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Editorial Review – Atlanta Stories:  Fables of the New South

 

Title:  Atlanta Stories:  Fables of the New South

Author:  G. M. Lupo

Genre:  Contemporary fiction / short stories

 

Atlanta Stories features seven short stories of people whose journeys take them to Atlanta. The characters are diverse–ranging from a young girl with echolalia to a woman who lost the use of her legs when a drunk driver hit her–and their stories are just as different and interesting. While the characters face their share of heartache, their stories are also tales of redemption, although not all that simple.

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Editorial Review – Uber Diva

 

Title: Uber Diva

Author: Charles St. Anthony

Genre: Humor

Part-memoir, part-guide, Uber Diva is an entertaining look at what it takes to be an Uber driver. Told from the perspective of the self-proclaimed Uber Diva, who is sidelined from the ridesharing business after a drunk driver totals her car and sends her to the hospital, it is helpful in weighing the risks and benefits of becoming a rideshare driver.

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Book Review – Simon vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda

 

Remember your first crush?

Remember walking down the corridors of your high school and blushing whenever you catch a glimpse of that one cute guy who seems to shine just a little bit brighter than everyone else?

Remember the late night conversations with your friends trying to decipher and construe every conversation and gesture, looking for any hidden meaning or indication that he feels the same way?

Remember your first heartbreak, like when you find out he likes someone else and you comfort yourself with a tub of rocky road ice cream and listen to emo music (Jann Arden in my case)?

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Editorial Review – Fake News

 

Title: FAKE NEWS: Strange historical facts reimagined in the world of Donald Trump

Author: David Hutter

Genre: Satire

This short book focuses on a variety of real-life historical facts and reimagines them as taking place during the presidency of Donald Trump.

Zany, abrupt, imaginative, and indulgent, the novella depicts Trump as a self-absorbed leader of the free world who still manages to get things done despite his capriciousness and the bickering of his staff.

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Editorial Review – Orphan

 

Title: Orphan

Author: T. R. Connolly

Genre: Contemporary fiction, murder mystery

 

This short novel tells the story of Chunk DeLuna, an orphan in Brazil who carves out a criminal empire built on drugs, prostitution, gambling, and corruption. Along the way, the novel also shares the struggles of Suzanne and Lupe, the two women who have shared DeLuna’s life, enduring his harsh ideas of love and happiness.

The story is very interpersonal and, at times, quite gruesome as it tells of the people DeLuna has threatened, blackmailed, or forced to do what he wants. Most of the time, the focus is on how DeLuna expands his realm rather than the day-to-day practices, so readers get to experience the business side rather than the operations themselves.

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