Uprooted – Book Review

Uprooted

 

In Naomi Novik’s Uprooted, a wizard called the Dragon protects a small mountain village from the evil forest called the Wood. Every ten years the dragon takes one young woman from the village as tribute. She will live in the Dragon’s castle the next ten years, and when she is released, much to the horror of her village, she will leave the mountain valley that is their home and never return.

Continue reading Uprooted – Book Review

Advertisements

Love Arrives in Pieces – Book Review

Love Arrives in Pieces

 

The Cover Story:
Former pageant queen Stella Varland doesn’t trust beauty anymore after her divorce. Her appearance betrayed her and led to her brokenness—so instead of being beautiful, now she tries to make beautiful things, but always falls short. So she keeps her passion for her secret art to herself and focuses on her interior design work. But if she doesn’t get another job soon, she’ll be stuck living with her parents.

Continue reading Love Arrives in Pieces – Book Review

The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Harry Potter) – Book Review

717QczcrOXL

 

Any Harry Potter fan will tell you that the Harry Potter universe is so much more than 7 books and 8 films. I know for me growing up it felt like a whole parallel universe happening around me that was just beyond my reach, but it was incredibly comforting to know it was there.

Continue reading The Tales of Beedle the Bard (Harry Potter) – Book Review

Station Eleven – Book Review

Station Eleven

 

Station Eleven

I’ve been wondering almost since starting Station Eleven (two days ago—yes, it really is that good) why it’s so clearly a breed apart from other apocalypse thrillers. I have an uncharacteristic but genuine affinity for disaster movies (this includes things with giant robots in them), and although some of them can be more than the sum of their parts, most of them, like most end-of-the-world books, are predictable. Entertainment, certainly; food for the soul, less so. But Station Eleven is something else entirely, and not just because the production of Shakespeare plays is central to the narrative.

Continue reading Station Eleven – Book Review

The Bone Season – Book Review

17199504

 

The Bone Season

The year is 2059. Nineteen-year-old Paige Mahoney is working in the criminal underworld of Scion London, based at Seven Dials, employed by a man named Jaxon Hall. Her job: to scout for information by breaking into people’s minds. For Paige is a dreamwalker, a clairvoyant and, in the world of Scion, she commits treason simply by breathing.

Continue reading The Bone Season – Book Review

On Writing – Book Review

41cqe00ZzsL._SX322_BO1,204,203,200_

 

I recently finished reading, well actually listening to, Stephen King’s On Writing: A Memoir of  the Craft. 

Highly recommended for all writers!

There’s a lot of conflicting advice about craft books for writers—some think you can’t learn from them, or that the best way to improve your writing is just by more writing. And I agree with the latter point. I also believe that books on writing can help you improve if you already are writing.

Continue reading On Writing – Book Review

Where They Found Her – Book Review

22693182

 

 

Name: Where They Found Her

Format: Hardcover

Pages:  336 pages

Publisher: Harper

Published: April 14, 2015

Genre: Mystery

Synopsis: “At the end of a long winter, in bucolic Ridgedale, New Jersey, the body of an infant is discovered in the woods near the town’s prestigious university campus. No one knows who the baby is, or how her body ended up out there. But there is no shortage of opinions.

Continue reading Where They Found Her – Book Review

Circling the Sun – Book Review

51FTAH7MTCL._SX336_BO1,204,203,200_

 

This review is based on an Advanced Reading Copy (ARC) from NetGalley to me:

I just finished reading Circling the Sun, written by Paula McLain – the author of The Paris Wife. Circling the Sun, published by Random House Publishing Group – Ballantine Books with a release date of early to mid July 2015, is based on the life of Beryl Markham (1902 – 1986).

This historical novel begins with Markham’s childhood at age four and continues to when Markham is in her early twenties. This situates McLain’s focus in the book between 1912 to the early 1920s. McLain admits to being “hijacked” by Markham’s life – and I believe her: Circling the Sun is a tremendous book that had me riveted, from beginning to end.

Continue reading Circling the Sun – Book Review

Over 150 Book Reviewer Bloggers Listed