Category Archives: Literary Fiction Reviews

Walls of Silence – Book Review

 

Rating: 5/5

This book is amazing. The topic of abuse is not something you want to think much about. It is mostly hidden behind a wall of silence and if it gets public attention, it’s usually garish sensationalism. Not so in this book. It is completely beyond me how the author managed to write about severe abuse – both as a child and as an adult woman – without it being garish and shocking. The atmosphere is one of quiet pain and that gets under your skin.

I could not put the book down and read it in one go deep into the night. I have read things like this before, but usually I either mentally squeeze my eyes shut and hurry through to get it over with or I want to scream with outrage. Here, I found myself trapped right along with Maria in the wide-eyed disbelief that this could really be happening, enduring the suffering with her.

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Throwback Thursday – The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

readers of broken wheel recommend

 

Throwback Thursday is a series where we take a look back at some of BRD’s most popular posts. Enjoy!

A book about reading . . . a book about a reading obsession . . . a book about a woman who would rather read than do just about anything else, who almost requires books just to survive?  Sounds like my kind of book.  In fact, it almost sounds like it might be about me (although my horses, my dogs, music and hiking give the books a run for their money on most days too).

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Throwback Thursday – The Conjoined

the conjioned

 

Throwback Thursday is a series where we take a look back at some of BRD’s most popular posts. Enjoy!

The Conjoined: A Novel by  Jen Sookfong Lee

While cleaning out her late mother’s deep freezer days after her death, Jessica and her father find a human body frozen at the bottom. They call the Vancouver police, who find a second body upon further inspection.

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Breaking the Silence – Book Review

 

Author name: Diamante Lavendar

Name of the book: Breaking The Silence

Genre of the book: Inspirational Fiction, Chick Lit, Memoir

Book synopsis: Joan Eastman was born like any other girl. However, her existence would prove to be a life of great pain. Growing up, she was treated differently by family members, powerless to defend herself against them. Feeling she had been dealt a wicked hand by the “powers that be”, she spiraled into despair and recklessness. She became a victim of agonizing circumstances and self-hatred.

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A Raisin in the Sun – Book Review

 

A Raisin in the Sun

By: Lorraine Hansberry

Review of the 1994 Vintage Books Paperback Edition, with Introduction by Robert Nemiroff

First Pub: 1959

Wow. Ok, so I have already read this play- hence the ‘re-read’ element of this review. Not every re-read warrants a brand new review, as often your opinion of a book will remain the same over time. However, when something happens, like your re-read book turns out to be SO MUCH BETTER THAN EVER REMEMBERED, well, this warrants a Re-Read Rapid Review.

Why did I have such a shocking change of heart- changing my review of ‘Raisin’ to the coveted 5-star section of my Goodreads account immediately upon finishing? Perhaps, I am now old enough to appreciate this play more than I did whilst reading it at school. OR, perhaps it is because this time, I *chose* to (re)read this title, instead of *having to read it* for a class. Or, perhaps I understand that era of American history better now than I did then, when my history classes were about Canadian history. No matter which factor influenced this fantastic re-read, I don’t care. I am just happy it happened.

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Editorial Review – Choose: Snakes or Ladders

 

Title: Choose: Snakes or Ladders

Author: Sally Forest

Genre: Literary Fiction

This rich, sensually-driven literary novel takes readers back to the 1950s, when women were just starting to enter the work-force alongside men on a more regular basis. The story follows Mitty Bedford, a typist who recently graduated with her certificate and has landed a job in the real world. Living on her own for the first time, she embarks on a journey of self-exploration in life, love, and her own sexuality.

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Hagseed – Book Review

hagseed

 

Hagseed by Margaret Atwood

Date Completed: 5/25/2017

Rating: 9/10

I jumped into this book knowing nothing about it, but that I had heard good things. I found that approach worked really well for me, so if you’d prefer, don’t read this, just know that you have my recommendation.

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The Burning Girl – Book Review

 

I review The Burning Girl by Claire Messud.

Julia and Cassie have been friends since nursery school. They have shared everything, including their desire to escape the stifling limitations of their birthplace, the quiet town of Royston, Massachusetts. But as the two girls enter adolescence, their paths diverge and Cassie sets out on a journey that will put her life in danger and shatter her oldest friendship.

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The Help – Book Review

 

Title: The Help

Author:   Kathryn Stockett    

Publisher:  Penguin Books

Set in the 60’s when civil unrest was at its height, Martin Luther King was making his famous speech, and black Americans began to make a stand, even at great personal risk. Jackson, Mississippi is a seat of KKK power, and working coloured people feared for their lives.

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Perfume, The Story of a Murderer – Book Review

 

Perfume, The Story of A Murderer by Patrick Süskind

This books full title is Perfume, The Story of a Murderer which is a very accurate description. However, the title in itself is also ambiguous. How is something so inconspicuous as perfume associated with the violence of murder?

The story straight away won me over because it is set in eighteenth century Paris. For me there is no better era to set a book; why pick anything else? Jean-Baptiste Grenouille is born into the most stench filled place on earth, a Paris slum, but he has the most sublime gift, an absolute sense of smell. He can smell everything, things that to you and me have no odour whatsoever. Not only that, he can remember every smell and he catalogues each carefully away in his mind to create the most exquisite perfumes.

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